An observation of the different ways i do gender

May 1, It was the way parents and society treated them that made them different. Since then, a preponderance of research has called this belief into question.

An observation of the different ways i do gender

By Sarah Ford Sociologists have long argued that gender is more of a social performance than a biological fact. In this post, Sarah Michele Ford uses two models to illustrate the performance qualities of gender.

Take a look at this model. Now take a look at this model. Sorry for the slight inconvenience. They both have cheekbones that could, as the saying goes, cut glass. And they are both models. You probably assumed that the first model is female and the second model is male.

The first model is Andrej Pejic, who models both mens- and womenswear. The second model is Casey Legler, who exclusively models menswear. Andrej is male and Casey is female. In society we often associate a particular gender with a particular biological sex.

Controlled Observation

In the United States we often connect masculinity to males and femininity to females, but this connection is socially constructed not to mention that both femininity and masculinity are socially constructed as well.

In the case of these two models, each performs a gender that is not inline with what society commonly expects from males and females. We perform gender when we choose what to wear in the morning.

We perform gender in our intimate relationships, and we perform gender when we are at school and at work. Andrej Pejic and Casey Legler, like all high fashion models, are very good at gender performances.

Gender performances, like so many other aspects of our lives, are governed by social norms. In contemporary American culture, femininity, for example, is stereotypically synonymous with being nurturing, with dressing in clothing that emphasizes or even sexualizes their bodies, and with an interest in fashion.

Obviously the descriptions above are over-the-top stereotypes. At the same time, our norms of gender performance are stringent enough that you probably had a pretty strong reaction to the idea of a Casey Legler performing masculinity and Andrej Pejic performing femininity.

How did you react to the revelation that the sex categories of the models did not match the genders that they perform? Why do you think you reacted in that way that you did? What assumptions about gender do Andrej Pejic and Casey Legler challenge?

How do you perform your gender? How can gender performances challenge gender norms? West, Candace and Don H.not only gender, but race as well. The third wave also included extensive campaigning for greater women’s influence in politics. Each of these waves have, in some way, contributed to overcoming gender discrimination in different sectors of a woman’s life, ranging from legal equality to social equality to equality in the workplace.

Psychological research shows that one's sex or gender have little or no bearing on personality, cognition and leadership. Men and Women: No Big Difference. Studies show that one's sex has little or no bearing on personality, cognition and leadership. Hyde is far from alone in her observation that the clear misrepresentation of sex.

An observation of the different ways i do gender

This observation would further the study, there maybe a correlation between gender and, not only type of bag being carried but also, bag carrying styles.

To do this part of the study, three carrying styles were identified: Wearing on body, carried over one shoulder, and other. Some causes can be traced to human evolutionary history, especially the ways that the division of labor is influenced by biology and environments. A human universal--in all known societies--is a division of tasks so that men do some things in society and women do others (Wood & Eagly, ).

Some Gender Observations January 17, by cultureofyes I was about to sit down to write a post on some recent observations about the increasing gender gap at teacher leadership events, when the latest edition of Education Canada from the Canadian Education Association landed on my desk.

Sociologists have long argued that gender is more of a social performance than a biological fact. Many students find this idea challenging because they have up until a sociology class felt their gender identity was just, “natural”. In this post, Sarah Michele Ford uses two models to illustrate the performance qualities of gender.

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